Cat 1 - 3 point conversion kit #yanmar


howard@...
 

Howdy again,

  I have a Category zero on my compact tractor.  I have contacted a few places that have a conversion on their websites.  One place, Hodges, I talked to an older guy there and he said he has not sold one in over 20 years.  And of course it is on their website.  Anywhoo, I am looking for one.  I know I can make one but with the custom top link transmission plate, all the angles and jogs needed in the lower bars, I figure why not buy one if available.  
--
New tractor guy, long time lurker.  Even longer tinkerer.
Yanmar Ke-3D (tore down front end waiting for parts from Japan)

Family of 5, saved by grace 
HartWater North Idaho Homestead


BMaverick
 

Howard,

By chance, could you forward the web site link where you found the conversion?  Just maybe with the community here, there are those of us with something like it called by something else or know where else to get them.  

As an FYI, my straight blade allows for the lower pins to be turned inwards for a CAT-0 to grab. And at times, longer pins can be used too for the CAT-0 to fully work.  It's only one example, but not all attachments work in that way. 

The KE-3D having a CAT-0 is very odd.  Is your plan to fully change that to a CAT-1? 

I do know Hoye Tractor Parts offers a bunch of 3PT hitch kit assemblies.

There are not many good views of the back of your machine on the web to figure out what kits may work.  




--
Yanmar Tractor Owners Group.  A valuable source for owners of Yanmar tractors.


howard@...
 

I was looking at this kit https://www.hodgesfarmequipment.com/productdetail.php?idx=806
I have read the chain stabilizers need to be used on the inbound side to avoid contact with the tires.  

My back blade mount is wider than the clearance between my tires, I looked into that option.  I may just have to do some cutting and welding on the back blade.



--
New tractor guy, long time lurker.  Even longer tinkerer.
Yanmar Ke-3D(tore down front end waiting for parts from Japan)

Family of 5, saved by grace 
HartWater North Idaho Homestead


Scotty
 

I think you mean "inboard" rather than "inbound", but the chains don't need to be on the inboard side. You can achieve good side sway stability - and protect the tires - with the chains chains either outboard or inboard.  In fact, having the chains on the outboard side is the preferred way as long as the chains themselves don't foul the tires. 

An alternative to chains as "side sway preventers" is to use telescoping steel square tubing with pins that drop to lock the length into position. Your best 3pt hitches once used that method and some manufacturers still offer it as a step up option. More rigid and faster too. 

Here's another trick: If you look at the top link and the leveling rods (RH and LH) in that illustration, you will see that both the top link and the RH leveling rods adjust their length by using threaded rods into that screw into what is basically a long cylindrical threaded nut with handles on both sides.

Instead of the threaded rods and cylindrical nut, the very best of the manual 3pt hitches used a right angle gear drive with a folding handle to adjust the leveling rods and the top link for length. You might have seen something similar on some European sports cars of that era. Their tire jack plugged into a hole in the frame and then used a right angle drive handle to quickly raise the tire. Mercedes was that way... maybe Volvo too.  I once welded up a set of crude leveling rods made up a set out of a couple of old sports car jacks. Looked terrible; worked fine. 

Today it is popular to replace the leveling rods and top link with two way hydraulic cylinders - making 3pt remote adjustment possible.   

The whole history of the 3pt hitch is fascinating. Before the 3pt was in general use tractors either used draw bars or the very dangerous 2pt hitch. 
Our old JD "M" had a two point hitch. 
enjoy, 
rScotty



On Apr 8, 2021, at 12:47 PM, howard@... wrote:

I was looking at this kit https://www.hodgesfarmequipment.com/productdetail.php?idx=806
I have read the chain stabilizers need to be used on the inbound side to avoid contact with the tires.  

My back blade mount is wider than the clearance between my tires, I looked into that option.  I may just have to do some cutting and welding on the back blade.



--
New tractor guy, long time lurker.  Even longer tinkerer.
Yanmar Ke-3D(tore down front end waiting for parts from Japan)

Family of 5, saved by grace 
HartWater North Idaho Homestead


Wally Plumley
 

Just in case someone is thinking about making the crank-adjuster links...

The "pull-a-part" auto parts yard near me sells auto jacks for $5 - I suspect that prices are pretty similar in most such yards.

I bought an extra Mercedes jack like that for the $5 - VERY well made.

Wally


On 4/8/2021 4:43 PM, Scotty wrote:
I think you mean "inboard" rather than "inbound", but the chains don't need to be on the inboard side. You can achieve good side sway stability - and protect the tires - with the chains chains either outboard or inboard.  In fact, having the chains on the outboard side is the preferred way as long as the chains themselves don't foul the tires. 

An alternative to chains as "side sway preventers" is to use telescoping steel square tubing with pins that drop to lock the length into position. Your best 3pt hitches once used that method and some manufacturers still offer it as a step up option. More rigid and faster too. 

Here's another trick: If you look at the top link and the leveling rods (RH and LH) in that illustration, you will see that both the top link and the RH leveling rods adjust their length by using threaded rods into that screw into what is basically a long cylindrical threaded nut with handles on both sides.

Instead of the threaded rods and cylindrical nut, the very best of the manual 3pt hitches used a right angle gear drive with a folding handle to adjust the leveling rods and the top link for length. You might have seen something similar on some European sports cars of that era. Their tire jack plugged into a hole in the frame and then used a right angle drive handle to quickly raise the tire. Mercedes was that way... maybe Volvo too.  I once welded up a set of crude leveling rods made up a set out of a couple of old sports car jacks. Looked terrible; worked fine. 

Today it is popular to replace the leveling rods and top link with two way hydraulic cylinders - making 3pt remote adjustment possible.   

The whole history of the 3pt hitch is fascinating. Before the 3pt was in general use tractors either used draw bars or the very dangerous 2pt hitch. 
Our old JD "M" had a two point hitch. 
enjoy, 
rScotty




BMaverick
 

Howard,

The product link you gave shows the OE mfg p/n.  I found it here too.
https://www.griggslawnandtractor.net/new-sparex-3-point-hitch-kit-yanmar-part-number-s70571/

Sparex S70571

On the RESOURCE page on our website, we have several parts suppliers that carry this.  Check them out. 

BMaverick 

--
Yanmar Tractor Owners Group.  A valuable source for owners of Yanmar tractors.