Topics

New member and pimped 2210D


Bill Pendergrass
 

Hi All,
I recently found this group after reading the other io groups I am a member of.  This place is great.  Thanks for all the prior work putting the data together.
My wife and I purchased a YM2210D roughly 10 years ago.  Both of us are farm raised but living away from our parents places.

I have done a few modifications and maintenance items with the help of Hoye.  If you don't mind, I'll share a few pics.

The major mods have revolved around widening the the wheel stance of the 2210D.
The rear wheels were flipped by the supplier at purchase. (unfortunately they folded a few years ago)
I found Hoye afterwards and bought the 4" rear wheel spacers.  I do recommend them.
Some time later, I decided cut and re-weld the rear fenders to move them out to the new wheel position.
After that, I realized I had room to mount a couple of ammo cases for tool storage next to the seat.  This has been fantastic.
I extended the deckplates for more foot area and most recently put some small steps in the VTec FEL to make it easier for an old body to get in and out.
I know the front ends are fragile so I have not modified this at all.  Rebuilt both of them with new spindles, needle bearings and seals a few years ago.
I did have a lot of trouble with flat front tires early on but think I have finally conquered that with rim bands to protect the tube from rough rims and being extremely anal about not driving in 4WD on hard surfaces. Plus replacement tires that are more robust that the stock ones.
Most recent was a water temperature gage. Again from Hoye.  This information feedback actually helped my driving style.
We have a 6 foot tiller and I was having overheating problems while using it.  The temperature gage helped me discover that I was running the tiller RPM too high.
Amazing how much power was being used by the PTO. No more issues now that I changed.
I welded a tractor pin mount point on the top of the loader bucket.  It allows me to install a long reach 3 point boom on the bucket.
The primary reason was to provide a tool for installing the cap on my full size pickup.
Lastly, the Vtec valve bellows wore out and my wife and I conspired to make a custom one. Working so far.
Here are some images.  Enjoy.

Bill Pendergrass






KC2GIU
 

Bill, 

Very nice.  You will need to share your DIY pimping your ride stories on those upgrades.  I've been looking at these pixs a few times today. 

Steve 


Bill Pendergrass
 

Thanks Steve,
I'll be happy to talk and share more pics.  I think the least well described is the pin pivot I welded to the bucket.  It needs an image with the boom installed.

Moving the fenders made a huge difference in access to the seat. Beforehand it was tight to snake my legs between the fender and the cowl while mounting the tractor.

I also shortened the 3 point hitch control lever to get it out of the way.  It was ridiculously too long in stock form I thought.


KC2GIU
 

Bill, 

Your cleverness to retain the ROPS, move the fenders out and add the tool box is very innovative.  And with most 2WD models, I know the front axle can move those wheel outboard too.  Nice work. 

Noticed the front area where weights can be mounted.  There are red plates mounted there.  What are those used for? 

Steve 


Wally Plumley
 

The first thing that I did when I bought my YM1500D was to reverse the rear wheels. The second thing was to make a set of spacers to move the fenders out as far as possible. I am not a big guy, but that still made quite a difference in ease of access.

Wally

On 3/20/2021 11:27 PM, Bill Pendergrass wrote:
Thanks Steve,
I'll be happy to talk and share more pics.  I think the least well described is the pin pivot I welded to the bucket.  It needs an image with the boom installed.

Moving the fenders made a huge difference in access to the seat. Beforehand it was tight to snake my legs between the fender and the cowl while mounting the tractor.

I also shortened the 3 point hitch control lever to get it out of the way.  It was ridiculously too long in stock form I thought.


Bill Pendergrass
 

Nice Wally.  I imagine you liked your mod as much as I did mine.

Steve,
First, the red bits near the front weight mounting area are part of the Vteks V2A FEL structure.
I chose to put water/alcohol into all 4 wheels instead of steel weights.  Mostly because of the front end fragility. The water weight does not ad load to the front axles.

Since you expressed interest in the pictures, I imagine the fender move is the main curiosity.
Pictures don't tell enough so I have attached a sketch with enough info (i think) for someone to copy what I did.

Also, I read some more of the site last night.  I take my hat off to the perseverance of Mr Yancey in the 2T90 rebuild.  What a story.

Also, to BMaverick, I am not really clear on the file upload etiquette here.  Please instruct me if needed.





KC2GIU
 

Bill, 

All messages or postings on the site with ATTACHMENTS or PHOTOS/IMAGES requires a moderator approval.  

GroupsIO gets hit with SPAM.  And this was the method GroupsIO chose to offer vs. the old Yahoo system that let "pron" and viagara ads appear by the boat loads. 

We trust our members, just that our group is a public one and not private.  So, people can join on a whim.  The first posting ever by a member is moderated too.  So groups moderate everything.  

So, if your first posting is approved you are good until you add an attachment, image or even an emojie icon smiley.  We tend to jump on those within 6 hours unless we got too busy. 

Now, people can post messages and place a link to images.  That goes thru fast.  In fact, we now have rScotty's brochures and other things from TBN.  He can easily point to those quickly. 

AND, if you do like READING, we have the past 30+ years of messages archived in PDF, MBOX, or Excel formats to browse in the FILES section on the GroupsIO site (not the box storage location.)  
https://yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io/g/main/files
 
So, that's it in a looong winded nut shell. LOL 

Steve 


Bill Pendergrass
 

Thanks. 
I had read about the moderating and was gratified by pretty darned quick review and release. Nice work.
I was more concerned about the file size and storage room comments.  I shrank my images to the point I thought proper to view on a monitor.

Btw, I found the post history you mentioned just a couple of hrs ago. I may try to read some although the format may be tough. I have not tried searching it yet which may make it a better experience.


KC2GIU
 

Bill, 

FYI, to save time, don't worry about resizing the images, that is automatically.  Images are scaled down to 1024x1024. 

And yes, the formats of the archive are really easy to be searchable. 

From 2005 to about 2010, there was so much spam, it was painful to follow anything.   BMaverick took weeks  filtering out much of the spam. 

The 2019 migration was actually the best thing to revive the community.  The previous owner vanished, and the group was left on auto-pilot with only 1 moderator who had limited controls. BTW, pinned at the top of the message section is our history info from Yahoo.  Actually a few things are pinned there for members to review and use. :) 

Steve 


Bill Pendergrass
 

Per promise, here's a picture of the 3 point boom connected to the bucket.
As you would expect, it is for light loads.
Original purpose was to allow installation and removal of my truck bed cap which it does fine.
That's really the limit.  The bucket won't tilt with the cap load on the boom, but the lift works fine.
So I have to get the bucket tilt (boom angle) where I want it for the procedure in the beginning.
The boom is not modified so it still fits the 3-point hitch as it was originally designed to do.


Scotty
 

Hmmm...  I bet we've all done some craning with our Front End Loaders. I know I have,
What do you use to keep it from tipping and falling sideways when it is all rigged up and ready to go? 
Just be careful with weight up high. 


On Mar 27, 2021, at 3:02 PM, Bill Pendergrass <rzbill@...> wrote:

Per promise, here's a picture of the 3 point boom connected to the bucket.
As you would expect, it is for light loads.
Original purpose was to allow installation and removal of my truck bed cap which it does fine.
That's really the limit.  The bucket won't tilt with the cap load on the boom, but the lift works fine.
So I have to get the bucket tilt (boom angle) where I want it for the procedure in the beginning.
The boom is not modified so it still fits the 3-point hitch as it was originally designed to do.

<BucketBoom.jpg>


Bill Pendergrass
 

Hi Scotty,
So far, side tipping has not been a problem. Two reasons I think.  First, loads have been centered because I pay attention to rigging.  Second, the 3 point bar at the bottom of the boom nests tightly against the bottom rear corner of the bucket.  That might not be evident in the image. It's pretty stable side to side.

You are right about lifting with the FEL.  Doggone handy.  I initially tried doing the cap with the bucket only.  While successful, it was ugly. Boom helped a lot.


Wally Plumley
 

I needed a boom lift for my YM1500D. My answer was to add three-point hitch attach pins to the back of an inexpensive automotive engine hoist. The arrangement works well - the engine hoist has a manual hydraulic cylinder to lift the boom in its usual application, and this (combined with the three-point lift travel) allows me to have the extendable boom at a wide range of heights, from touching the ground to almost straight up. The engine hoist is strong enough that the weight limit on the system is set by the three-point lift.

Wally


On 3/28/2021 9:11 AM, Bill Pendergrass wrote:
Hi Scotty,
So far, side tipping has not been a problem. Two reasons I think.  First, loads have been centered because I pay attention to rigging.  Second, the 3 point bar at the bottom of the boom nests tightly against the bottom rear corner of the bucket.  That might not be evident in the image. It's pretty stable side to side.

You are right about lifting with the FEL.  Doggone handy.  I initially tried doing the cap with the bucket only.  While successful, it was ugly. Boom helped a lot.


Ronald Kelner
 

Greetings Bill:

Welcome to Yanmar Tractor's Owner web site. Since my Dad passed away in 2008 the group of individuals associated with this group have been invaluable in helping me repair and maintain my Yanmar 2210D.

Shortly after my Dad's passing I overheated the 2210D when cutting 36" tall grass on a hot day and it shutdown. My friends with the usual american made tractors (Allis Chalmers, Deere, Ford) informed me my radiator was probably plugged with debris and should also make multiple passes cutting high grass lowering the mower with each pass. Since then after each use I use compress air to clean 2210D radiator and stay on top of all my Farm's fields keeping grass height to 12" or less. And no mechanical problems since then.

Hence, when I saw your 2210D temp gauge I'd ask myself being a computer nerd could I install one on my 2210D?
Can you share the model/make and mfg. of your temp gauge? My understanding is adding one to a Yanmar requires British Tapered threads.
I know one of the three lights to the right of your temp gauge is a temp light, did you replace temp light sensor  with the wire from your new temp gauge? There is no wire for my heat light so no idea where sensor is screwed into the engine. My Hoye 2210D owner's manual does not show any diagrams for it either. Will have to search for it... 
Also, did you use a metal hole saw (Home Depot) on a drill to make the hole in panel for the temp gauge? Looking at the metal it seems awful thick for a hole saw.

Final question and if I am being too nosy just say so.
May ask what you paid for your 2210D and when you purchased it?
I would like to refurbish my 2210D to the standard I see in your photos.
Reasons: My local tractor friends say the overheating episode probably scorched the 2210D pistons and cylinders. Also, 5 years to retirement. Then more time to spend on my 160 acre former 1950s dairy farm. Do not like the loader on my 2210D and would like to replace it with a shorter one like on your 2210D and with joy stick too.

My dad and I purchased our 2210D in April 2005 for $7000 and no mechanical issues other than RPM cable replaced. I consider the $7000 a sunk cost now and no bearing on future decisions. I found a place in Texas that refurbishes Yanmar tractors and they look identical to your tractor when completed. Have been searching for 5 years now for a refurbished 2210D and told they are extremely rare or non existent. Was  thinking trade-in.
Now, thinking is to keep saving every pay check and within the next couple of years (maybe after retirement) haul 2210D to Texas and and have it completely refurbished.
Now how long I live after refurbishment do not know, but with a 2210D and loader (with grapple forks for logs) like you have I would be extremely happy working on my little hobby farm for whatever time I have left on earth. Yes this is a want and Not a need.

Regards,

Ronald


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Bill Pendergrass
 

Wow Ronald,
I have questions for you too!

I'll start with yours first. Temp gage.
Here's the link: Hoye temp gage 
The old light is no longer connected.
The temperature sensor replaces the temperature switch that ran the light.
It looks like Hoye has changed the indicator gage from when I bought but that's unlikely to make any difference.
Yes the sensor thread may be BSPT but under 3/4" there is little practical difference from NPT. I think the Hoye piece is correct anyway.
So.. the hole in the dash. Like you, I inherited my dad's tools. I got a full set of greenlee panel punches.
It could be done with a hole saw. Run it slow and use some oil. It will smoke but that's ok.
Clean the hole edge with a file and sandpaper the best you can.
It's what I used before having the punches.

I had my tractor stop once. Light never went on that I noticed.  Still not sure it was an overheat but it probably was. Got the gage, changed how I use the PTO and all has been good even running the tractor hard. 

Compression test. If you are concerned about cylinders. Get the tools or have it done. Does it start easy? Hard starting is a symptom of poor compression.

Next, price.  Kinda'  hard to tell. We bought around 2010. The price was a lump sum for the tractor, new FEL, 6 foot blade and 6 foot tiller.  Based on what I have seen for individual pricing of those things, I think we paid about the same as you for the tractor itself. Pretty close anyway.

So, I have questions for you.  First, I am amazed that the 2010D handles the bushhog.  I dont need one but I'm impressed. Are you running it in PTO 1st gear?

This leads to the second point. I'm also impressed with the disc harrow.  That looks very much the same as the one I used to pull as a kid on my grandpa's N model Ford.  So.. my current conundrum.  I want a bottom plow and I have not come to grips with whether the 2210D will pull a double like the Ford did. My cousin is pulling a double 16 with a Kubota of similar weight and only a couple of more HP.  I think the 2210D will but there is vague  commentary on the web that it will not.  It's an expensive experiment to find out.  There is a YouTube of a 1500 pulling a single just fine and fast too.


Bill Pendergrass
 

I missed the loader comment.  Mine is a Vteks V2.  I have zero, really zero information about it. Nothing from the original local grey market seller who is now out of business and my internet searching has led nowhere. Disappointing really.


Ronald Kelner
 

Greetings Bill:

1. Its not a Brush Hog it is a JD 413 48" rotary field mower. Definitely a difference between the two mowers. If I keep it at 2000 RPM (using PTO 1) it will easily handle thick pasture grasses up 6-8" height. I have cut up to 18" - 20" height but raise mower up and make multiple passes clipping 6" off at a time.

2. I suspect your cousin's kubota of similar size and HP to a 2210D can pull a two bottom plow because the kubota has a 4 cylinder engine. When it come to pulling a plow its not so much HP but torque that is the defining answer. Rule of thumb I was given: you go from two cylinders to three you have increased the torque by 1/2 = 50%. Likewise  two to four you double or 100% increase.
I would not attempt to pull even a 12" 2-bottom plow with your 2210D, my thought - over heating or burn the bearings out.

3. The blue disc in my photo has its place but not for regular field work. Its a 3-point hitch setup. So you disc only in a straight line  and the constant lifting and turning is fatigue and cumbersome leading to damage equipment. That being said it does have its place in small wildlife food plots say 60' by 200' where you can't or do not want to plow first. The combination of that heavy disc and ~ 350 lb weight allows it to cut right through the sod and drop 8" deep into the soil. Hit a plot for an hour a week over 4-6 weeks and it is ready for broadcast seeding or even a drill seeder. If not satisfied. I have a 5' 6-tooth Spring tooth that can cut down to 24" after the plot is disc up several times. That really works the soil up and would recommend one.

 4. Late last October I plowed up four small fields using a one bottom plow and it was fun at first, but eventually tedious and somewhat boring not to mention very time consuming. But when done very rewarding to look at what you have accomplished. Even more so when its planted and fully growing. I will use a 6' drill seeder to plant Little and Big Bluestem (4-6') also known as bunch grass this June or September. It is a dry cool season grass native to the Northern Great Plains and provides excellent habitat - cover and nesting for birds.

5. The loggers had picked up my other disc - a pull behind articulated style and broke it in half when hauling it with their massive grapple skidder (it made a full size one ton pickup look like a tonka toy).
I managed to repair the front half with the cutting discs and being a pull behind towed it across the fields in all different directions resulting in a better job of disking (more thorough), far less time consuming (higher speed, no stopping/lifting/dropping disk) and not nearly as exhausting.

Note: I did try the blue 3-pt hitch but it sunk down so deep in the air pockets beneath the plowed soil the 2210D could not pull it. I had to disconnect tractor and disc. Then using two 100' x 1"  cables used pickup to pull disc out of the plowed field then the tractor. Being so the much lighter the pull behind 1/2 disk worked far better and the only way I will go in the future on a plowed field.

Hope this helps.

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On Sunday, March 28, 2021, 08:50:33 PM CDT, Bill Pendergrass <rzbill@...> wrote:


Wow Ronald,
I have questions for you too!

I'll start with yours first. Temp gage.
Here's the link: Hoye temp gage 
The old light is no longer connected.
The temperature sensor replaces the temperature switch that ran the light.
It looks like Hoye has changed the indicator gage from when I bought but that's unlikely to make any difference.
Yes the sensor thread may be BSPT but under 3/4" there is little practical difference from NPT. I think the Hoye piece is correct anyway.
So.. the hole in the dash. Like you, I inherited my dad's tools. I got a full set of greenlee panel punches.
It could be done with a hole saw. Run it slow and use some oil. It will smoke but that's ok.
Clean the hole edge with a file and sandpaper the best you can.
It's what I used before having the punches.

I had my tractor stop once. Light never went on that I noticed.  Still not sure it was an overheat but it probably was. Got the gage, changed how I use the PTO and all has been good even running the tractor hard. 

Compression test. If you are concerned about cylinders. Get the tools or have it done. Does it start easy? Hard starting is a symptom of poor compression.

Next, price.  Kinda'  hard to tell. We bought around 2010. The price was a lump sum for the tractor, new FEL, 6 foot blade and 6 foot tiller.  Based on what I have seen for individual pricing of those things, I think we paid about the same as you for the tractor itself. Pretty close anyway.

So, I have questions for you.  First, I am amazed that the 2010D handles the bushhog.  I dont need one but I'm impressed. Are you running it in PTO 1st gear?

This leads to the second point. I'm also impressed with the disc harrow.  That looks very much the same as the one I used to pull as a kid on my grandpa's N model Ford.  So.. my current conundrum.  I want a bottom plow and I have not come to grips with whether the 2210D will pull a double like the Ford did. My cousin is pulling a double 16 with a Kubota of similar weight and only a couple of more HP.  I think the 2210D will but there is vague  commentary on the web that it will not.  It's an expensive experiment to find out.  There is a YouTube of a 1500 pulling a single just fine and fast too.


Bill Pendergrass
 

Ronald,
Thanks a lot for the detailed answer. I will stick with a single bottom if I find one to purchase.
I don't have the multiple field tedium problem of the single bottom that you did because I am only tending a vegetable garden of roughly 1/4 acre.

I think you are making much more use of your tractor than me.  Its just the little garden, dirt driveway maint, snow removal ( I added a strip of car tire to the blade for snow scraping) and general project stuff around the yard.

Have a good upcoming weekend!


BMaverick
 

Bill, 

For a veggie garden, why not a PTO tiller instead.  No bottom plow nor disc harrow needed.  

I'll be using my disc harrow with the YM2610 for a few more years.  Woods turned to pastures and garden plots.  Never needed a bottom plow.  Just added enough blocks atop of the disc harrow and it did all the work. 

Your machine has the 2T90 engine. It's much like the 2TR20.  Not sure why Yanmar had 2 engines in 2-cly series with the same ratings. 


BEFORE it looked like a garden .... 




--
Yanmar Tractor Owners Group.  A valuable source for owners of Yanmar tractors.


Bill Pendergrass
 

Hi BMaverick,
I do have a 6 foot PTO tiller and it works just as you describe.  The desire for a bottom plow is due to living in good ole NC red clay.  Repeated rotary tilling of the soil can create a hard layer at the tilling depth.  I want to bust it and turn it over.  Also I have some soil amendments and winter cover crop I would prefer to flip and bury rather than chop.  I have thought about the single tine ripper sold by Tractor Supply to aid the tiller but would prefer a turning plow.