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New to the Group and new owner of a YM165D w/Great Bend 524 FEL


Jim
 

Hello all,

I recently purchased a YM165D and seems to be a strong little tractor. It is my first tractor, so I am learning as I go. Can anyone tell me what actual attachments or implements that are suitable for this tractor? I think it is considered a Cat 1 but correct me if I am wrong. Thanks for any help you may provide. :)


Jim H.
YM165D


Winston Linda Maberry
 

The 165 could actually have a category 0 or 1 hitch. You can go to the manuals section here and see the parts manual. This can help you know which you have. Understanding 3-point hitch categories | Hutson Inc 


KC2GIU
 

Jim, 

Winston is right.  We tend to look at both the Yanmar data and then reference the John Deere documents because the information is easier to obtain.

Here is info for a JD Cat-0
https://salesmanual.deere.com/sales/salesmanual/en_NA/lawn_equipment/attachments/bm17327_cat_0_three_point_hitch.html 

Looking at the YM165(D) manual here for FREE on our site, (go to the left column and click on the WIKI and then click RESOURCES PAGE), it shows BOTH options for having either a CAT-0 or a CAT-1. 

With my bigger YM machine, I have used 2 types of Cat-0 attachments.  Just need to have the side pins LONGER.  One was a ground aerator and the other a dethatcher.  Both work find on garden tractors SCUTS. 

Now, putting a Cat-1 on a Cat-0 machine is either not possible or possible due to the 3PT geometry of the attachment.  The possible ones are the type to have the low pins face inwards and still hook up.  DUE NOTE, Cat-1 attachments may be heavier in weight or need more of a lift to get them off of the ground.  This would be more trial and error and knowing what could work with your machine. 

Download the PDF manual, look at thee 3 sections and compare them to your nice machine: 
40. REAR HITCH
41. THREE-POINT HITCH(CATEGORY 0)
42. THREE-POINT HITCH(CATEGORY 1)

Steve 


Scotty
 

Welcome, Jim. I had a YM165D from new until just recently when it was destroyed in a flood. We loved that tractor - and you can find my posts about it stretching back to the start of social internet.
The YM165D was the last improvement of the venerable YM135D/YM155D series. They are very reliable tractors and the 165 is the best of that group; ours never did require any repairs. 
It has a typical Category I 3pt hitch, and so it is at least capable of mounting and trying to use any Cat I implement. But Category 1 extends roughly up to 30 HP tractors, so there are going to be some Cat I implements that are just too large for it to handle. It won't hurt it to try. On ours we used a 4 foot box blade with rippers  and a 5 foot angling back blade with offset & tilt. It pulled both of these OK up to about half full, but ran out of power to pull either one when they were clear full of dirt. The PTO could run a small auger, backhoe pump, or a 4 foot mower - but with all of these I had to be careful because these are tools that can overload a small 3pt and PTO. 
Keep in mind that it is a small tractor, maintain and don't overload it, and it will last 100 years.

The YM165D does have some special needs: 
1. You need to check the trans/hydraulic fluid to make sure it has not become debased (milky looking) from rain and condensation. You MUST cover the tractor - they are prone to water intrusion in several critical areas. This is a design defect & was pointed out by Yanmar itself in several technical bulletins. So check or change the trans/hydraulic fluid and at the same time you should clean the cleanable oil filter - under the triangle plate on the transmission with three bolts roughly under your right heel. Be careful with that filter and it will last many years.
2. The YM165D - like the 135&155 - is not cooled by the familiar water pump forcing circulation through the engine and radiator. It doesn't have a water pump
These and several other older tractors are cooled by a density dependent process called: thermosiphon circulation. 
This leads to two special needs. The radiator itself needs to be kept clean of dirt and chaff. Clean it by playing low pressure water and a soft soapy brush to push the dirt from the fan side and out the front of the radiator. 

The coolant itself has to be a specially diluted mix of water and the standard old style green ethylene glycol antifreeze. But you need to mix it yourself to make sure that the proportion of water to glycol is right. Too much glycol doesn't transfer heat well enough for thermosiphon to work, and too much water can freeze and ruin the whole engine and radiator - pretty much ruining the tractor. 
So use old style pure ethylene glycol green antifreeze and dilute it to between 40 to 60% with distilled water. A 50/50 mix is fine. This will protect the coolant from freezing and also transfer enough heat to make the cooling system work. Change it every 5 or ten years.

That's about it. There are some other special needs like rusty brakes and the fuel gauge - but the two above are the most important.
enjoy,
rScotty  



On Mar 14, 2021, at 7:26 AM, Jhwarrior6@... wrote:

Hello all,

I recently purchased a YM165D and seems to be a strong little tractor. It is my first tractor, so I am learning as I go. Can anyone tell me what actual attachments or implements that are suitable for this tractor? I think it is considered a Cat 1 but correct me if I am wrong. Thanks for any help you may provide. :)


Jim H.
YM165D


Scotty
 

Oh, and here is the original sales brochure from when we bought the tractor. 
rScotty





On Mar 14, 2021, at 7:26 AM, Jhwarrior6@... wrote:

Hello all,

I recently purchased a YM165D and seems to be a strong little tractor. It is my first tractor, so I am learning as I go. Can anyone tell me what actual attachments or implements that are suitable for this tractor? I think it is considered a Cat 1 but correct me if I am wrong. Thanks for any help you may provide. :)


Jim H.
YM165D


KC2GIU
 

Jim, 

In our photos section, I did find a member who posted their YM165D with the Cat-1.  There was not a name associated to the album when we migrated from Yahoo over a year ago.  They seem to put the machine to great use. 

Steve 


Jim
 
Edited

Winston,  Steve,  and Scotty,
Thanks a lot for the tips and detailed descriptions. Scotty, Sorry to hear about your loss.  I wish i had you look at my tractor before i bought it.  I definitely want to check and replace all the fluids and everything you pointed out.  I hate to admit it but I may have had the wool pulled over my eyes. I'm a rookie tractor owner but I think there are some items really needing attention. I am not sure the previous owner knew much about them either. It runs well and everything works so that is a plus. I ordered some manuals for it. I need to find out all the necessary fluids it takes and how to properly service it.  Nonetheless,  I think it will be fun as a project and workhorse. Glad i found this group. 
--
Jim H.
YM165D


Jim
 

Scotty, 
I have quite a few questions. What type of trans/hydro fluid does it take? Is the hydro/ trans system all in the same system,  to include the fel? What is involved with changing the trans/ hydro fluids? Sorry for all the questions but i can't find the service manual online or the operating manual. Thanks Scotty!

--
Jim H.
YM165D


KC2GIU
 

Jim, 

Here is a slew of info.  Yanmar made their YM series compact tractors for JD for over 25 years.  The easiest fluids to get are the same spec'ed JD fluids.  

Hydraulic fluid


Engine oil 




Jim
 

Awesome.
Thanks KC2GIU
--
Jim H.
YM165D


Scotty
 

"I have quite a few questions."

Sure you do. And not only the ones you know, but the ones you don't - like how to check if the weep hole for the steering column is open or plugged, and why are the brakes so grabby? Is that crud or what that I see in the fuel filter? Look! There's a small hand lever right there on the fuel filter! Should I be turning that lever? Ever? 
Or you might marvel at having a a compression release right there on the dashboard.... What is that about? Clearly they figured it was important, but why? And what the heck is something called "Thermostart"?

Oils are a good place to start and you really can't go wrong - the reason being that oils have advanced so much since this tractor was designed that it would be hard to pick an oil that wasn't better than the original recommendations.
You won't go wrong to use a genuine Yanmar Engine oil filter and Rotella DIESEL 15w-40. Or if not Rotella use your choice of oils. Butdo look on the container to make sure that the API donut rates it as a Diesel Oil, not Gasoline engine oil.  Diesel oils are C series....like CD, CJ, CI+ etc. Gasoline engine oils are S series. 

Trans/Hydraulic used to be JD303 - but it isn't made anymore and the ingredients are not available. It never had a performance spec, so oils that claim to be spec'd as JD 303 are likely to be hype. In fact, a lot of re-processed oils claim to meet that JD303 spec because it doesn't exist. So I like to use any name brand dual purpose Trans/hydraulic oil. You have a primitive gear tranny and simple hydraulic system. I use John Deere Hy-Gard in most everything and it or any similar oil will be fine. I've seen plenty that just used 10w-30 engine oil in the tranny. That's not the best idea, but I've never seen one damaged by it either. 

It IS IMPORTANT to clean out the cleanable transmission filter and check for water in that oil - i.e. looks milky...sometimes even stringy. 

Your front axle also needs a draining and new oil. Could be water there as well. I like the new multi weight gear oils - anything in the 70w-90 range. Fill it to half way up the axle. Check that the vent works

About your FEL. Well, some of the FELs used the tractors internal hydraulic pump and therefore used the same oil as the transmission. It was popular on the YM155/165 to put an accessory pump for the FEL on the front of the crankshaft and use one of the FEL uprights as an oil reservoir. Nicer, but another $500 at the time. If you post a picture of the front of the engine crankshaft and also one looking down at the top of the transmission between your feet we might be able to tell what you have.

I think we have a service manual for the YM165D online in this group. It is a PDF, but what you really want are an operating manual and a parts manual. Wish I could help, but all mine went away in the flood that also killed our tractor..... I would pay good money for one of those 3 ring binder official OEM Yanmar YM165/D shop manuals - the ones with the red plastic covers. Going price is roughly $100 to $125 for that shop manual, maybe $50 for the parts manual, and similar for ops manual. I lost the similar set for the YM336/D too... Darn. I like those original printed manuals. These are OEM prices of course. You can find .pdfs for way less. 

Luck 
rScotty



On Mar 14, 2021, at 5:26 PM, Jhwarrior6@... wrote:

Scotty, 
I have quite a few questions. What type of trans/hydro fluid does it take? Is the hydro/ trans system all in the same system,  to include the fel? What is involved with changing the trans/ hydro fluids? Sorry for all the questions but i can't find the service manual online or the operating manual. Thanks Scotty!

--
Jim H.
YM165D


KC2GIU
 

Jim, 

Our group only has the YM165 Parts Manual for FREE via out WIKI > Resource Page found on the bottom of the left corner here on the website. 

YANMAR YM165 PARTS MANUAL Y00T2391.pdf

Otherwise, "service" manuals can be ordered via Hoye Tractor or Fredricks Equipment.  I've head that Jensales has manuals too, but I've not come across anyone who has one of those.  Before ordering, ask to ensure the manual is not a photo copy reprint nor one that covers similar models, but not really yours.  Even with the US domestic YM machines, I've heard that being done when it shouldn't be. 

The service manual publication is =  SME1650(0)8210 
parts manual is = K05E1159 
 
Like rScotty said, the YM165 is possibly the strongest SCUT of the US domestic machines sold. Getting into the CUT level the YM240 holds it's place really well.  Then the powerful YM330 & YM336 are the larger CUTs.  Yes, there are models all in-between too, however, not as popular. 

Steve 


KC2GIU
 

rScotty, 

Great advice! 

About those RED binder 3-ring Service Manuals, still use caution.  The binders may be of great quality, but the pages on the inside could be a reproduction of a bad reproduction.  And they may not come with section dividers.   It's the only reason why I mentioned Hoye and Fredricks vs a possible reproduction eBay type.  Sure there are good originals on eBay, just got to find and verify. 

JD303 was based on whale oil lubrication.  And whaling has been banned globally.  45+ states also have a ban on anything even labeled as JD303.  So, you are 100% right, JD303 doesn't exist anymore. 
Hy-gard J20C most temp range or J20D really cold and high altitude range.   The only issue using 10W30 straight in the hydraulics, no friction modifiers, thus, things will slip often when the FEL is left sitting upwards over a period of time.  No leaks, just that the FEL will drop, likewise the 3PT arms will lower over time too. And the JD20C and J20D have anti-bacterial growth inhibitors to keep the nasty things from eating the oil and making scum in the system. :)   So, I like your info using the JD20C spec'ed oils.  Even the universal oils that meet or exceed the J20C are good too.  Just need to VERIFY. 

I will back you up 100% on the importance to keep the hydraulic filter screens clean.  Once these get filled up, the tractor's 3PT isn't working, the FEL stops, and with the PowerShift, the tractor just sits there stranded.
Sooooooo, best to do a drain and save of the fluid and clean the screen.  Then refill with the fluid again.  I do this every Spring now.  

Bummer you lost the YM336 info too. I've seen the pixs of your posted flooding.  Amazing that more wasn't lost. 

Steve