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Thermostart Manual - Winter use instructions #yanmar


KC2GIU
 

Yanmar Community,

As the temps keep dropping across the northern hemisphere the need to start diesels with heat is a bonus.  Most Yanmar tractors have a device called a thermostart.  

Hoye Tractor Parts has an excellent write up on this device here:
https://www.hoyetractor.com/thermostart.htm

The attached document is a single page taken out of a YM 3-digit OPS Manual.  Which one, not sure.  For the most part, it should be informative on how to use the device in cold climates to start the diesel engines.

Additionally, J20C and J20D hydraulic fluid is a must in these cold climates.  5w30 and 10W30 for the engine is also a must in the cold climates.  15W40 will turn like molasses making the starter work harder and fail sooner.  Lube and grease the fittings too. 

Our Yanmar diesels don't like it way too cold in the single digits or colder.  The engine may drop a cylinder sleeve.  If you rely on your machine in the winter, take into account the temps and wind chills for operation.  Ideally, a shed with an oil pan heater and/or coolant heater is a plus to have.

Shortly the time ahead will drop further in temps, the wind will kick up, snow will be drifting as old-man-winter comes into full swing of things.

Keep yourself winter safe too with layers and if possible a tractor cab in some form.  This was discussed in last months forum postings on the site. 

Steve


KC2GIU
 

A few more thermostart instructions attached along with the device.

Some machines you will need to fill the small reservoir with clean diesel fuel.  Other machines have a hose connection to the injectors or the fuel tank. 
In the cold weather in near 0F temps, this device along with using the decompression will really help the starter turn the engine over to fire right up.
 



tomkat685@...
 

Getting ready for some Christmas snow up in the snow belt and the little 1401D is ready for plowing with the back blade.  Steve, your comments about dropping a cylinder sleeve with a cold engine gives me some concern. Typically we don't get the cold some of you folks get in the upper midwest and much of our plowable lake effect snow comes with temps in the 20's and 30's before the Lake freezes over. But I understand that any cold will place stress on metal, moving parts and lubricants. 

I've mowed with the tractor every summer and plowed for the last 20 years or so and she's still running.  I want to keep her running for as long as possible and now thinking I should be more cautious of the winter temps when plowing.  Perhaps this is another topic but since I'm not able to store the Yanmar in shelter during the winter (only tarped), what recommendations are there for heaters?  The 1401 doesn't seem to have enough straight sections in the coolant hoses to install an in-line heater there.  I typically use a magnetic heater attached to the bottom of the oil pan,  but this probably only warms up the oil in the pan a bit leaving the block cold.  I've seen some engine heating blankets.  Any other suggestions?  


KC2GIU
 

Tomkat,

I've had to make-do with 3 cattle panels and a double tarp as a shelter to keep the machine out of the wind and blowing snow.  Cost was less than $200.  The high winds in the mid-west really keeps the windchill low.

I brought up the sleeve dropping comment as a diesel mechanic mentioned how he replaces sleeves in an old diesel engines.  Bringing the block down below 0F for 48 hours and with a shop press, the sleeves nearly slip out too easy. 

Should the temps over nigh reach 0F for a few hours, we should be alright, it's that long week or so of temps sitting that low I would have a concern. 

Yes, a block heater, oil pan warmer and a coolant heater all can help greatly.  The shelter part would be the ideal along with the mentioned heaters.

Is it possible to acquire a Shelter Logic small tarp shed or if cost is a concern, Harbor Freight offers their clone of the shelter. 

Now, on CL, there are companies that sell those shipping containers.  The shorter 20Ft-ish size would be ideal for a tractor shed.  About $1K and cheaper than a shed and permits depending where you live.

I did have a concern last year when the temps dropped to -22F.  Snow was over 18-inches.  I warmed up the Yanmar the best I could and started out slow till the engine warmed.  However, the coolant was solid like a rock.  So, I just parked it, shut down and went inside.  Lesson learned, have the right coolant mixture of 60/40 for sever lower temps.  Oil as 5W30 in extreme lower temps too.  5W40 if you can not find a 5W30 in your stores for diesel. 

Once I had the machine outside from a rain to ice.  Took 15 long mins with a hair dryer just to get the key in the hole. From that point on, I knew it needed a shelter. 

Steve


Winston Linda Maberry
 

Not saying this heater will fit your 1401. Just saying it is suppose to be a 30mm heater which I believe is the size of the 1401 freeze plugs. No idea about the depth behind the plug allowing the heater to go in far enough. Just something to ponder. 
Amazon.com: Kat's 11417 400 Watt 30mm Frost Plug Heater: Automotive

I think this is the freeze plug that fits the 1401. FREEZE PLUG 30 MM _: Yanmar Tractor Parts (hoyetractor.com)


KC2GIU
 

Winston,

Great post.  The link over to Amazon also provides more of those Kat's heater elements.  There could be a solution for nearly everyone.

Steve


Winston Linda Maberry
 

Maybe, but I know some of those blocks do not have the needed space for the heating element to fit in. 


KC2GIU
 

Winston,

While looking thru a few of the US 3-digit YM models, I came across this as OPTIONAL equipment.  I did a search on the part numbers and got nothing.
p/n YTI446-59100, YTI446-59110, YTI446-59120, YTI446-59140, & YTI446-59150.  

Basically, those part numbers are for different wattages.

Between Kat's and Zerostart block heaters, what ones for example fit the YM169 then as just a reference point from where I got this image.  Then are the YM 4-digit machines having the same capability?  I've not scanned those parts manuals for this feature yet. 

Anyone can chime in here. 

Steve



Winston Linda Maberry
 

I scanned numerous 4 digit parts manuals and none show the heater as an option but I know the heater will work on some. If you read Hoye's input on the one they sell it says it will fit "most" 3 cylinder models. Here is an interesteing thread about them. 4tnv88 Block Heater (tractorbynet.com)


tomkat685@...
 

Here's the heater on Hoye's site:  
https://www.hoyetractor.com/PROD/BH-400.htm


KC2GIU
 

Winston, 

The link is VERY HELPFUL.  Even the images of the Zerostart device looks so much like the YM165 device in the Parts Manual. 
 
The first page shows various part numbers for a wide range of wattages too.  Really nice.

Tomkat mentioned about a thermal blanket to use for machines without the capability of a heater element.  That got me thinking.  A local ACE Hardware store uses these infrared heaters in their all season shelter for the winter time.  They sell snow blowers, shovels, straw and hay bundles in the shelter.  These provide great warmth.
 
A quick look on Amazon got something close to what they are using.
https://www.amazon.com/Comfort-Zone-CZQTV5M-Ceiling-Quartz/dp/B06Y3MCRXG/ref=sr_1_7?dchild=1&keywords=Infrared+Garage+Heater&qid=1608917349&sr=8-7

Steve


tomkat685@...
 

A quartz heater might not be a bad idea.  Placing a small unit under the tarped tractor might keep the engine warmer as long as it didn't get too hot.  I wonder if the radiant heat would be more efficient.


KC2GIU
 

TomKat,
 
Getting tarp hot could result in a fire or even a melted tarp all gooey on the tractor. 

Is it possible to find FREE pallets to make a small shelter for the tractor?  Then tarp the top like a roof?  This would help protect the machine and allow the heat to be central to the tractor.

This past summer, looking on CL in my area, there were several small shelter structures offered for FREE.  Much of the time, you would have to take the shelter down or figure out how to load it on a trailer.  My trailer wasn't wide enough, but it's long enough. :) I'm still keeping tabs on a nice one.

Steve
 


tomkat685@...
 

I did consider the melting tarp issue but was wondering if the radiant heat from a quartz heater would have a different effect on the tarp than on the metal of the tractor.  I'm not a scientist but what I read is that radiant heat heats objects not the air like convective heat.  Thinking it over - I supposed the tarp would be a heat absorbing object. 

I did buy a 10X10 "Portable Shed" from Harbor Freight a couple of weeks ago and it's now storing a couple of my garden tractor projects.  It's OK but I don't have space to put another one up since I like to keep the tractor ready in the driveway. 

A quick review of the HF portable shed.  It's effective for rain and light snow, but I feel the 24" of snow we had over the past couple of days would have collapsed the unit if I hadn't pulled the trapped snow off the roof.  The unit only has 2 ends and one center arch at 5' that supports the entire roof and walls. I was curious and looked up the average weight of snow and it averages 20 lbs/cubic foot so if I'm right,  5' x 5' x 2' of snow would weight around 1,000 lbs per section and 4,000 lbs for the whole roof!  I'm sure it could have burst though the roof.  I ended up adding some 6" wide support pieces running from the ridge to the top of the walls in between the supports at 2.5'  to help relieve some of the snow weight from the unsupported centers on the cover and will try to keep the snow from building up on it when we get more snow,  If this thing survives the winter, I may use it next year for the Yanmar.


KC2GIU
 

Tomkat,

Nice work on the H-F portable shed.  Mine is a DIY.  Took horse coral panels (3) and then cattle panels (3) and tarps (2).  The horse coral panels are the tubular steel type (tarter) and the cattle panels are the 48-inch high welded wire type that can bow for a hoop house effect.  A bunch of zip-ties locking them together.  Then zip-tie the traps over the top.  Yes, snow gets heave.  And as it melt and then refreezes, the weight is even more.  The hoop effect has flattened, the tractor ROPS was the only thing keeping it up last winter till I snagged a 4x4 8ft post to support the middle back.

Smart to reinforce the H-F structure. 

The infrared heaters are portable enough to be placed under the hood and over the battery.  Having one face the radiator is a huge help to prevent coolant freeze or coolant being like a slushy.  Then the engine oil and then the hydraulic fluid needs some warmth too.  I looked at those magnetic heaters as well.

Steve