Topics

Unpopular F175 or what is similar?


toogzweire@...
 

Hi!

Just acquired an (apparently pretty impopular) F175 type.
Searched a bit on the interwebs to find out there is not much to find out on these....

What would be the nearest type that would have parts better available (accessories, etc) for the F175.
As there are no real howto's or other video's of this type, does this mean it's a sturdy, troubleless tractor?

Thx


BMaverick
 

T, 

Welcome!  

Saw your posting this afternoon, had to get home to approve it.  All new members with their first posting needs approval,  It's the only way to keep out the spammers. 

We do have a Parts Manual that is very close. 

YANMAR F-FX 145 155 165 175 PARTS MANUAL NPC-0446.pdf

On the website, login.  On the left side at the bottom, click on WIKI and then the RESOURCE PAGE.  This page has the most valuable info including the manual section to browse and download. 

The F-FX Series machines are difficult to obtain information on.  We tend to work our way thru the issues. 

BMaverick 

--
Yanmar Tractor Owners Group.  A valuable source for owners of Yanmar tractors.


toogzweire@...
 

Hi BMaverick,

Thanks for having me, and providing the great tips!

Any idea whether the type of engine, used in the F175, was also used in other types (or brands) of Yanmar tractors?

T


George Mason
 

Hi T,

I too am the owner of an apparently unpopular Yanmar, an AF120 in my case. I am also hopeful mine is trouble free as the parts are hard to find. 

I have had success buying some few parts direct from Japan (there is a website aptly called FromJapan.com which helps with this). The engine parts seem easy enough to obtain once you work out what motor yours has, as the engines are used in lots of other machines (mini excavators, JD SCUTs etc) 

Whilst on the subject if anyone knows of a parts book for the AF120 I would be very interested! 

I might have a list of models/engines translated from Japanese, I will have a look and report back. 

Welcome and good luck with your new machine! 

George 

On 23 Feb 2021 19:29, toogzweire@... wrote:
Hi!

Just acquired an (apparently pretty impopular) F175 type.
Searched a bit on the interwebs to find out there is not much to find out on these....

What would be the nearest type that would have parts better available (accessories, etc) for the F175.
As there are no real howto's or other video's of this type, does this mean it's a sturdy, troubleless tractor?

Thx
2.13.0.0


KC2GIU
 

T,

Usually on the engine there is an engine plate with the engine model. 

Here are a few examples to look for:
https://www.dieselpartsdirect.com/yanmar-examples-of-the-engine-epa-eu-labels-2
or
https://www.dieselpartsdirect.com/examples-of-the-engine-epa-eu-labels
or
https://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/files/yanmar/14197d1058111973-engine-your-yanmar-291346-engine-id-plate-cropped

So mention on one of the rear fenders is an ID plate for the F and FX Series.  Not sure myself.

IF anyone has that info for a F175, please provide.  This would help us to help you too.

Steve


r. burgen
 

Since I am not familiar with the AF120 I just looked at a big bunch of AF120 photos.... nice looking machines
Only TWO had an FEL!
:))BOB

On Feb 24, 2021, at 12:24 AM, George Mason <george@...> wrote:

Hi T,

I too am the owner of an apparently unpopular Yanmar, an AF120 in my case. I am also hopeful mine is trouble free as the parts are hard to find. 

I have had success buying some few parts direct from Japan (there is a website aptly called FromJapan.com which helps with this). The engine parts seem easy enough to obtain once you work out what motor yours has, as the engines are used in lots of other machines (mini excavators, JD SCUTs etc) 

Whilst on the subject if anyone knows of a parts book for the AF120 I would be very interested! 

I might have a list of models/engines translated from Japanese, I will have a look and report back. 

Welcome and good luck with your new machine! 

George 

On 23 Feb 2021 19:29, toogzweire@... wrote:
Hi!

Just acquired an (apparently pretty impopular) F175 type.
Searched a bit on the interwebs to find out there is not much to find out on these....

What would be the nearest type that would have parts better available (accessories, etc) for the F175.
As there are no real howto's or other video's of this type, does this mean it's a sturdy, troubleless tractor?

Thx
2.13.0.0


sheaftractor
 

THE f175 has a 3TNA75UNA

 

From: main@yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io [mailto:main@yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io] On Behalf Of KC2GIU
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 6:06 PM
To: main@yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io
Subject: Re: Unpopular F175 or what is similar?

 

T,

Usually on the engine there is an engine plate with the engine model. 

Here are a few examples to look for:
https://www.dieselpartsdirect.com/yanmar-examples-of-the-engine-epa-eu-labels-2
or
https://www.dieselpartsdirect.com/examples-of-the-engine-epa-eu-labels
or
https://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/files/yanmar/14197d1058111973-engine-your-yanmar-291346-engine-id-plate-cropped

So mention on one of the rear fenders is an ID plate for the F and FX Series.  Not sure myself.

IF anyone has that info for a F175, please provide.  This would help us to help you too.

Steve


toogzweire@...
 

Hi guys,

Great info, much appreciated!
Once available and where possible I will share details on the F175 on the Resource-page.

T


George Mason
 

Hi Bob

Yeah it's a nice machine, it seems to have been round the block a few times but everything works. Terrifying amount of electronics but mostly I need it for the FEL and not so much for tilling etc. Had it about a year and so far no problems other than some oil being burnt in the engine (need to strip it/fit new piston rings etc. most likely) and some hydro oil weeping from the PTO shaft.

Got it for very little money compared to most other things I looked at so no regrets at this point! Managed to get a hydro filter from Japan and the engine parts are easy to get as mentioned in my earlier email.



From: "r. burgen" <copcycle@...>
To: main@yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 25 February, 2021 00:44:19
Subject: Re: Unpopular F175 or what is similar?

Since I am not familiar with the AF120 I just looked at a big bunch of AF120 photos.... nice looking machines
Only TWO had an FEL!
:))BOB

On Feb 24, 2021, at 12:24 AM, George Mason <george@...> wrote:

Hi T,

I too am the owner of an apparently unpopular Yanmar, an AF120 in my case. I am also hopeful mine is trouble free as the parts are hard to find. 

I have had success buying some few parts direct from Japan (there is a website aptly called FromJapan.com which helps with this). The engine parts seem easy enough to obtain once you work out what motor yours has, as the engines are used in lots of other machines (mini excavators, JD SCUTs etc) 

Whilst on the subject if anyone knows of a parts book for the AF120 I would be very interested! 

I might have a list of models/engines translated from Japanese, I will have a look and report back. 

Welcome and good luck with your new machine! 

George 

On 23 Feb 2021 19:29, toogzweire@... wrote:
Hi!

Just acquired an (apparently pretty impopular) F175 type.
Searched a bit on the interwebs to find out there is not much to find out on these....

What would be the nearest type that would have parts better available (accessories, etc) for the F175.
As there are no real howto's or other video's of this type, does this mean it's a sturdy, troubleless tractor?

Thx
2.13.0.0



Wally Plumley
 

Your machine, your time, your money - but you can put a lot of oil in an engine for what is required to rebuild it. As long as the power loss is minimal, the reliability is still good - why bother?

Wally


On 2/25/2021 9:17 AM, George Mason wrote:
Hi Bob

Yeah it's a nice machine, it seems to have been round the block a few times but everything works. Terrifying amount of electronics but mostly I need it for the FEL and not so much for tilling etc. Had it about a year and so far no problems other than some oil being burnt in the engine (need to strip it/fit new piston rings etc. most likely) and some hydro oil weeping from the PTO shaft.

Got it for very little money compared to most other things I looked at so no regrets at this point! Managed to get a hydro filter from Japan and the engine parts are easy to get as mentioned in my earlier email.


Scotty
 

Yep, I agree with that. Oil burners can go a long time as long as they have enough compression to start and run. There was a time - in the 1950s is when I remember it - when lots of cars were "oil burners" but otherwise ran OK. Back then I worked nights in a service station that also did general mechanical work. ....most service stations did. 

Something to think about is that if oil passes the rings one way, chances are that unburned fuel is passing the other way & diluting the engine oil's lubricity. So if you are going to run an oil burner, the frequency of oil changes should go up to protect the various bottom end bushings and bearings. It wasn't uncommon to see a cam bearing or small end rod bushing go bad before any wear was evident in the crank and big ends. 
rScotty


On Feb 25, 2021, at 7:42 AM, Wally Plumley <wplumley@...> wrote:

Your machine, your time, your money - but you can put a lot of oil in an engine for what is required to rebuild it. As long as the power loss is minimal, the reliability is still good - why bother?

Wally


On 2/25/2021 9:17 AM, George Mason wrote:
Hi Bob

Yeah it's a nice machine, it seems to have been round the block a few times but everything works. Terrifying amount of electronics but mostly I need it for the FEL and not so much for tilling etc. Had it about a year and so far no problems other than some oil being burnt in the engine (need to strip it/fit new piston rings etc. most likely) and some hydro oil weeping from the PTO shaft.

Got it for very little money compared to most other things I looked at so no regrets at this point! Managed to get a hydro filter from Japan and the engine parts are easy to get as mentioned in my earlier email.



George Mason
 

Very interesting, I was considering an oil change, I'll bring that up the agenda. I don't have the filters etc. yet but they are easy enough to get hold of here.

On another note, the link I posted to FromJapan earlier was wrong, it is in fact: https://www.fromjapan.co.jp/en/

All the best

George



From: "Scotty" <roger@...>
To: main@yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 25 February, 2021 15:42:46
Subject: Re: Unpopular F175 or what is similar?

Yep, I agree with that. Oil burners can go a long time as long as they have enough compression to start and run. There was a time - in the 1950s is when I remember it - when lots of cars were "oil burners" but otherwise ran OK. Back then I worked nights in a service station that also did general mechanical work. ....most service stations did. 

Something to think about is that if oil passes the rings one way, chances are that unburned fuel is passing the other way & diluting the engine oil's lubricity. So if you are going to run an oil burner, the frequency of oil changes should go up to protect the various bottom end bushings and bearings. It wasn't uncommon to see a cam bearing or small end rod bushing go bad before any wear was evident in the crank and big ends. 
rScotty


On Feb 25, 2021, at 7:42 AM, Wally Plumley <wplumley@...> wrote:

Your machine, your time, your money - but you can put a lot of oil in an engine for what is required to rebuild it. As long as the power loss is minimal, the reliability is still good - why bother?

Wally


On 2/25/2021 9:17 AM, George Mason wrote:
Hi Bob

Yeah it's a nice machine, it seems to have been round the block a few times but everything works. Terrifying amount of electronics but mostly I need it for the FEL and not so much for tilling etc. Had it about a year and so far no problems other than some oil being burnt in the engine (need to strip it/fit new piston rings etc. most likely) and some hydro oil weeping from the PTO shaft.

Got it for very little money compared to most other things I looked at so no regrets at this point! Managed to get a hydro filter from Japan and the engine parts are easy to get as mentioned in my earlier email.




Scotty
 

Just change the oil more frequently on an oil burner. You can stay with the longer change interval on the filter.
rScotty

On Feb 25, 2021, at 8:50 AM, George Mason <george@...> wrote:

Very interesting, I was considering an oil change, I'll bring that up the agenda. I don't have the filters etc. yet but they are easy enough to get hold of here.

On another note, the link I posted to FromJapan earlier was wrong, it is in fact: https://www.fromjapan.co.jp/en/

All the best

George


From: "Scotty" <roger@...>
To: main@yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 25 February, 2021 15:42:46
Subject: Re: Unpopular F175 or what is similar?

Yep, I agree with that. Oil burners can go a long time as long as they have enough compression to start and run. There was a time - in the 1950s is when I remember it - when lots of cars were "oil burners" but otherwise ran OK. Back then I worked nights in a service station that also did general mechanical work. ....most service stations did. 

Something to think about is that if oil passes the rings one way, chances are that unburned fuel is passing the other way & diluting the engine oil's lubricity. So if you are going to run an oil burner, the frequency of oil changes should go up to protect the various bottom end bushings and bearings. It wasn't uncommon to see a cam bearing or small end rod bushing go bad before any wear was evident in the crank and big ends. 
rScotty


On Feb 25, 2021, at 7:42 AM, Wally Plumley <wplumley@...> wrote:

Your machine, your time, your money - but you can put a lot of oil in an engine for what is required to rebuild it. As long as the power loss is minimal, the reliability is still good - why bother?

Wally


On 2/25/2021 9:17 AM, George Mason wrote:
Hi Bob

Yeah it's a nice machine, it seems to have been round the block a few times but everything works. Terrifying amount of electronics but mostly I need it for the FEL and not so much for tilling etc. Had it about a year and so far no problems other than some oil being burnt in the engine (need to strip it/fit new piston rings etc. most likely) and some hydro oil weeping from the PTO shaft.

Got it for very little money compared to most other things I looked at so no regrets at this point! Managed to get a hydro filter from Japan and the engine parts are easy to get as mentioned in my earlier email.





George Mason
 

Understood, thanks Scotty.

TBH I don't know the history of the machine and it doesn't look like it's been particularly cared for, so this time I'll do it just to know where I am. Will bear in mind for future changes though.

How often would you say I need to change the oil? It doesn't burn huge amounts, but you can really smell it when the motor is under load, and blue smoke all over the place.



From: "Scotty" <roger@...>
To: main@yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 25 February, 2021 16:05:22
Subject: Re: Unpopular F175 or what is similar?

Just change the oil more frequently on an oil burner. You can stay with the longer change interval on the filter.
rScotty

On Feb 25, 2021, at 8:50 AM, George Mason <george@...> wrote:

Very interesting, I was considering an oil change, I'll bring that up the agenda. I don't have the filters etc. yet but they are easy enough to get hold of here.

On another note, the link I posted to FromJapan earlier was wrong, it is in fact: https://www.fromjapan.co.jp/en/

All the best

George


From: "Scotty" <roger@...>
To: main@yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 25 February, 2021 15:42:46
Subject: Re: Unpopular F175 or what is similar?

Yep, I agree with that. Oil burners can go a long time as long as they have enough compression to start and run. There was a time - in the 1950s is when I remember it - when lots of cars were "oil burners" but otherwise ran OK. Back then I worked nights in a service station that also did general mechanical work. ....most service stations did. 

Something to think about is that if oil passes the rings one way, chances are that unburned fuel is passing the other way & diluting the engine oil's lubricity. So if you are going to run an oil burner, the frequency of oil changes should go up to protect the various bottom end bushings and bearings. It wasn't uncommon to see a cam bearing or small end rod bushing go bad before any wear was evident in the crank and big ends. 
rScotty


On Feb 25, 2021, at 7:42 AM, Wally Plumley <wplumley@...> wrote:

Your machine, your time, your money - but you can put a lot of oil in an engine for what is required to rebuild it. As long as the power loss is minimal, the reliability is still good - why bother?

Wally


On 2/25/2021 9:17 AM, George Mason wrote:
Hi Bob

Yeah it's a nice machine, it seems to have been round the block a few times but everything works. Terrifying amount of electronics but mostly I need it for the FEL and not so much for tilling etc. Had it about a year and so far no problems other than some oil being burnt in the engine (need to strip it/fit new piston rings etc. most likely) and some hydro oil weeping from the PTO shaft.

Got it for very little money compared to most other things I looked at so no regrets at this point! Managed to get a hydro filter from Japan and the engine parts are easy to get as mentioned in my earlier email.






Scotty
 

I wouldn't go crazy changing it. What we used to do is smell the oil and feel it between our fingertips to see if it smelled too strongly of fuel, that it still felt slippery, and was not abrasive with too much soot in the oil..... touchy/feely stuff.....kind of like the modern internet..... i.e. more based on opinion rather than science.  

Slightly more scientific is to put one drop of used oil on a flat piece of filter or blotter paper then look at the rings that are formed. 
There used to be special paper for doing that, but I wonder if a coffee filter would work. Or paper towel. Or any cheap blotter paper. Anyway, it costs little to try and will let you see and measure quite a bit more about the relationship of the oil to soot. Let the drop sit flat on the paper overnight and then look at the oil spot and concentric rings of clean and sooty oil. Then do that same oil spot test 5, 10, 20, 50 tractor hours later and see if it changes..... Keep the samples. Let us know if you learn anything. Even if nothing is definite I bet you'll feel like you are being proactive

Soot formation might also depend on how the tractor is being used. So I don't know....change twice a year? or 4X?? At least you know there is no downside to doing it more often. Except maybe wearing out the drain plug, That probably needs some thought. I might even put in a drain plug within a drain plug so that I only removed the center one - which is easily replaceable instead of wearing out the threads in the oil pan.
Who makes a concentric drain plug these days? Does McMaster Carr or Zoro.com sell one? Or make your own. 

Good oil is real cheap these days. So I'd say feel the oil, do the oil spot test & go from there.

The type of oil (API rating) counts for more than you might think. Since oil-burning also means that soot is getting into the oil, your best bet would be to use a Diesel Oil rated somewhere between API CF-4 through CI-4+. 
The CF-4 thru CI-4+ are the specific range of API grades that had special additives for keeping the soot dispersed in the oil to prevent clumping and a pseudo-viscosity increase due to soot buildup. After CI-4+, the emphasis on additives changed because engines were changing to the Tier IV more modern emission controlled engines. Those newer engines all were required to have external diesel soot & particle filters of some sort, and so the emphasis on soot dispersion in engine oils changed to other concerns. 

Last I was in Home Depot & Walmart (pre-covid!) , they had several suitable oils so they should be easy to find.

Sure is nice to see people using good old tractors. Yanmars were made to last forever.
rScotty


On Feb 25, 2021, at 9:22 AM, George Mason <george@...> wrote:

Understood, thanks Scotty.

TBH I don't know the history of the machine and it doesn't look like it's been particularly cared for, so this time I'll do it just to know where I am. Will bear in mind for future changes though.

How often would you say I need to change the oil? It doesn't burn huge amounts, but you can really smell it when the motor is under load, and blue smoke all over the place.


From: "Scotty" <roger@...>
To: main@yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 25 February, 2021 16:05:22
Subject: Re: Unpopular F175 or what is similar?

Just change the oil more frequently on an oil burner. You can stay with the longer change interval on the filter.
rScotty

On Feb 25, 2021, at 8:50 AM, George Mason <george@...> wrote:

Very interesting, I was considering an oil change, I'll bring that up the agenda. I don't have the filters etc. yet but they are easy enough to get hold of here.

On another note, the link I posted to FromJapan earlier was wrong, it is in fact: https://www.fromjapan.co.jp/en/

All the best

George


From: "Scotty" <roger@...>
To: main@yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 25 February, 2021 15:42:46
Subject: Re: Unpopular F175 or what is similar?

Yep, I agree with that. Oil burners can go a long time as long as they have enough compression to start and run. There was a time - in the 1950s is when I remember it - when lots of cars were "oil burners" but otherwise ran OK. Back then I worked nights in a service station that also did general mechanical work. ....most service stations did. 

Something to think about is that if oil passes the rings one way, chances are that unburned fuel is passing the other way & diluting the engine oil's lubricity. So if you are going to run an oil burner, the frequency of oil changes should go up to protect the various bottom end bushings and bearings. It wasn't uncommon to see a cam bearing or small end rod bushing go bad before any wear was evident in the crank and big ends. 
rScotty


On Feb 25, 2021, at 7:42 AM, Wally Plumley <wplumley@...> wrote:

Your machine, your time, your money - but you can put a lot of oil in an engine for what is required to rebuild it. As long as the power loss is minimal, the reliability is still good - why bother?

Wally


On 2/25/2021 9:17 AM, George Mason wrote:
Hi Bob

Yeah it's a nice machine, it seems to have been round the block a few times but everything works. Terrifying amount of electronics but mostly I need it for the FEL and not so much for tilling etc. Had it about a year and so far no problems other than some oil being burnt in the engine (need to strip it/fit new piston rings etc. most likely) and some hydro oil weeping from the PTO shaft.

Got it for very little money compared to most other things I looked at so no regrets at this point! Managed to get a hydro filter from Japan and the engine parts are easy to get as mentioned in my earlier email.







George Mason
 

Hi Wally,

Well, yeah if you put it like that, it makes no sense. I'm just a bit picky when it comes to such things and enjoy a challenge. That said, I've not done it yet, so we'll see!

My next project is retrofitting some turf wheels I just bought that came off a JD 2120. The current ag rims are doing much damage to our turf and my marriage 

Cheers

George


From: "Wally Plumley" <wplumley@...>
To: main@yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 25 February, 2021 14:42:04
Subject: Re: Unpopular F175 or what is similar?

Your machine, your time, your money - but you can put a lot of oil in an engine for what is required to rebuild it. As long as the power loss is minimal, the reliability is still good - why bother?

Wally


On 2/25/2021 9:17 AM, George Mason wrote:
Hi Bob

Yeah it's a nice machine, it seems to have been round the block a few times but everything works. Terrifying amount of electronics but mostly I need it for the FEL and not so much for tilling etc. Had it about a year and so far no problems other than some oil being burnt in the engine (need to strip it/fit new piston rings etc. most likely) and some hydro oil weeping from the PTO shaft.

Got it for very little money compared to most other things I looked at so no regrets at this point! Managed to get a hydro filter from Japan and the engine parts are easy to get as mentioned in my earlier email.



BMaverick
 

George and all on the channel here, 

Under preview, I didn't understand why the posting needed approval.  When coming to the thread I noticed why.  The smiley face at the end of the sentence. 

GroupsIO is setup to allow pre-approval of any group emails coming in with images to prevent spam and from other criteria outlined in their TOS. 

So, for those who wonder why messages take a little while (up to a day) it's because of myself logging in on the site to approve the messages. 

Carry on, I like this thread. 

rScotty, thanks for the engine model info.  

The 3TNA75UNA is the first generation of the 3TN75 engine with EPA emission controls.  The manuals below are all related that that engine and series. 

Some of these are posted already in the Manuals section.  IF you need one that isn't give a shout. 

YANMAR ENGINE 3TN75 PARTS CATALOG 0CNP2-G17400.pdf

YANMAR ENGINE 3TN75-RSR PARTS MANUAL 0CNP2-G17400.pdf

YANMAR JOHN DEERE ENGINE 3TN 4TN SERVICE MANUAL CTM3.pdf

YANMAR SERVICE MANUAL - FUEL INJECTION 2TR-2T-3T SERIES YT7708-216E.pdf 

Also we have this ...

YANMAR F-FX 145 155 165 175 PARTS MANUAL NPC-0446.pdf 

Wish there were more, but F & FX are hard to locate. 

BMaverick 


--
Yanmar Tractor Owners Group.  A valuable source for owners of Yanmar tractors.


r. burgen
 

George
I didn’t catch if your unit is 4wd. If so, be sure to read some previous important discussion here regarding front to back size ratio and determining "rolling circumference".
Bob


On Feb 25, 2021, at 7:03 AM, George Mason <george@...> wrote:

Hi Wally,

Well, yeah if you put it like that, it makes no sense. I'm just a bit picky when it comes to such things and enjoy a challenge. That said, I've not done it yet, so we'll see!

My next project is retrofitting some turf wheels I just bought that came off a JD 2120. The current ag rims are doing much damage to our turf and my marriage <undefined>

Cheers

George


From: "Wally Plumley" <wplumley@...>
To: main@yanmar-tractor-owners.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 25 February, 2021 14:42:04
Subject: Re: Unpopular F175 or what is similar?

Your machine, your time, your money - but you can put a lot of oil in an engine for what is required to rebuild it. As long as the power loss is minimal, the reliability is still good - why bother?

Wally


On 2/25/2021 9:17 AM, George Mason wrote:
Hi Bob

Yeah it's a nice machine, it seems to have been round the block a few times but everything works. Terrifying amount of electronics but mostly I need it for the FEL and not so much for tilling etc. Had it about a year and so far no problems other than some oil being burnt in the engine (need to strip it/fit new piston rings etc. most likely) and some hydro oil weeping from the PTO shaft.

Got it for very little money compared to most other things I looked at so no regrets at this point! Managed to get a hydro filter from Japan and the engine parts are easy to get as mentioned in my earlier email.



toogzweire@...
 

Hi BMaverick,

I am probably looking in the wrong section. Found some of the manuals, but I didn't find these:

YANMAR ENGINE 3TN75 PARTS CATALOG 0CNP2-G17400.pdf

YANMAR ENGINE 3TN75-RSR PARTS MANUAL 0CNP2-G17400.pdf

YANMAR JOHN DEERE ENGINE 3TN 4TN SERVICE MANUAL CTM3.pdf

T


KC2GIU
 

T, 

Thanks.  I'll take a look at the PDFs if they are ready to upload.

Steve 

FYI for our new members, just because we have the PDF manuals, we go thru each one to determine if they are: 

- Legit.  We have seen faked tractor manuals; some as good fakes, others are easy to spot. 
- Some manuals have personal info on covers or on the inside leaf pages.  With PDF tools we remove those to respect privacy. 
- Almost half the manuals are in protected state, meaning you can not do anything but print.  No copy-n-paste text nor images are allowed. 
- Most manuals have java-script malware to purge
- Some of the PDFs have overlapping objects making it hard to read and see details.
- Some manuals have an annoying click on the page anywhere and it opens a tab in your browser to a website from a tractor parts supplier. Sneaky, but glad it wasn't some scam site. 
- Embedded search indexes and then transmit your activity somewhere out to the internet. 

With the PDF tools, it takes a bit of time to process a PDF file.  We are making headway.  Lots of manuals are available.  Still, with the few people who work at this, it's all volunteer.  So it's now more of when someone has a need.

In the wings are 27 Yanmar tiller manuals.  Some have been uploaded as people do have a need for certain models. 

There are other Yanmar Snow-Blower manuals found too.  Some as walk-behinds and others as 3PT rear and front mounted too. 

There there are the Yanmar diesel Gensets manuals.  On TBN, the subforum is called Yanmar air cooled engines.  Good stuff there. 
 
Steve